Monthly Archives: July 2014

Book Review: The Girl with the Dargon Tatto by Stieg Larsson

20140730_144912[1]Book 1 of the Millennium Trilogy. More than 26 million copies sold worldwide.

Henrik Vanger, head of the dynastic Vanger Corporation, is tormented by the loss of a child decades earlier and convinced that a member of his family has committed murder.

Mikael Blomkvist delves deep into the Vangers’ past to uncover the truth behind the unsolved mystery. But someone else wants the past to remain a secret and will go to any lengths to keep it that way.

Lisbeth Salander, the enigmatic, delinquent and dangerous security specialist, assists in the investigation. A genius computer hacker, she tolerates no restrictions placed upon her by individuals, society or the law.

A stunning thriller debut, that had me in thrall from beginning to end. Brilliantly written and totally gripping plot and deeply intriguing characters. One of my favourite of all times thrillers.

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Book Review: Who Killed Angelique? by Emma Darcy

20140730_142540[1]“I’ll give you all the dirt darling.”

K.C. Gordon can’t wait to find out what her old school friend Angelique means by this cryptic comment. But before they meet someone cuts short the life of international model Angelique Lanci in a hail of bullets.

Loved by few, despised and envied by many. Angelique instigated infidelities, salacious gossip, betrayal and jealousy. But did she deserve to be gunned down in her own home?

As K.C. Gordon successful romance novelist, surveys the assembled family members, past and present acquaintances, business associates and ex-lovers standing at Angelique’s graveside, all with a motive for seeing their nemesis dead, she knows she’ll get her own hands dirty unravelling the truth of Who Killed Angelique?

A stunning crime fiction novel that keeps you guessing of who had more motive to murder Angelique then the other acquaintances. With dirty secrets revolving around drugs, sex and a deep jealousy comes this riveting crime tale by Emma Darcy.

 

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Rejection is a right of path for every writer

Nearly every book that you have read has undoubtly been rejected by publishers. For most aspiring authors it is an amazing achievment when we have finished our work in progress (WIP) that is now a complete written and edited manuscript. What to do now? Well now we take a chance and get that manuscript out there to literary agents or publishing companies. But let us not be discouraged if it is rejected because you can always try again with different companies, or write another book. Just don’t become discouraged and give up. Like these following authors never gave up.
After 5 years of rejections a publishing deal is finally gotten and now Agatha Christie sales now around $12 billion.
J.K. Rowlings was rejected 12 times before Harry Potter waa acceptted.
Louisa May Alcott was told to stick to teaching and yet she never gave up her dream. Little Women sells millions and is now still in print 140 years later.
24 literary agencies turned down The Notebook by Nicholas Spark. 25th time was the charm.
60 times rejected for the world wide best seller The Help by Kathryn Stockett.
15 rejections was given before publication of The Diary of Anne Frank selling 25 million.
14 rejections were given to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight that sell 17 million copies.

JMR

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Movie Adaptations

The book is mostly always better than the movie, though that doesn’t mean that the movies are any less good. The movie adaptations of books have a high standed that they have to achieve for fans of the books and most of the time they succeed in bringing to screen these books.
The Harry Potter movies brought to life J.K. Rowlings characters and though some parts in the books are not in the film, they are just as magical in telling the story of the boy who lived.
Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code was a gripping mystery that had me finishing the book within two days. The movie adaptation with Tom Hanks kept to the story line and succeeded in its book to film adaption.
Peter Jackson’s movie adaptation of The Hobbit is very much different to the book. As only a 300 pages novel it is split into 3 movies( the third yet to be out) roughly around 3 hours each, there is bound to be differences to the movie adaption, but having read the book and seen the latest movies I found that for once the differences did not matter as they can be both enjoyed as the book version and movie version separately.
Another is the adaptations of Pride and Prejudice. If you have read the book and want a good adaption then get the Colin Firth adaption, though six hours long, it is worth it as it basically follows the book page by page. The 2005 movie adaptation with Keria Knightley is a reasonable adaptation to watch when you don’t have six hours free.
But even with some good movie adaptations there are some that just do not do the book justice which is when we have to understand that it is an adaptation and it can’t be exactly like the book. What are youe thoughta about movie adaptations?

JMR

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Mrs Ann Radcliffe

I was around thirteen years old when I came upon this book “The Romance of the Forest”, it was a gothic novel that had me hooked on to the story as it follows the orphan Adeline through a combination of mystery and suspense. So started my phase of interest in gothic literature, in particular Ann Radcliffe, the author of the novel and others such as “The Mysteries of Udolpho” (the very same book that is mentioned in Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey.) Very little is known of Ann Radcliffe life. English-born in 1764 July 9th, she married in 1787 to Oxford graduate and journalist William Radcliffe, and it is said that they had a seemingly happy marriage.

Radcliffe’s novels are characterised by the supernatural events that are then provided with rational reasons. Her style is romantic with vivid descriptions of landscapes and travel scenes, with large combination of Gothic elements with the use of the supernatural. With this technique, Radcliffe, explained Gothicism, the final revelation of the unusual phenomena, she is considered to be one of the founders of Gothic literature, despite the fact that others had written in this element, Radcliffe’s novels legitimised the genre and allowed it to receive the respectability in 1790s. Radcliffe influenced many other writers including Edgar Allen Poe, Sir Walter Scott, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and Wilkie Collin’s the Woman in White.

JMR

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Why do I write and read?

The other day someone asked me why is it that I write and read so much? Now I went on and told them that the reason I write and read is for the same reason because I enjoy doing it. When reading I am able to leave my very normal life of work and chores and live in a world of the paranormal or join the hunt for the murderer in the mystery novel. The same reason I write is because I can go anywhere and be anything when writing my characters, and that is the fun experience about it. It is as if when I am writing or reading I join the world that the main characters are involved in, travelling with them and experiencing the joy and sorrow, or the danger and pain. It is a step away from reality, which I think is why many people would agree why they read or write is because what we read or write is usually very different to the lives we lead.

But what about you, why do you read and/or write?

JMR

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Poem for the day

                         Love by George Herbert.
Love bade me welcome: yet my soul drew back,
Guilty of dust and sin.
But quick-ey’d Love, observing me grow slack
From my first entrance in,
Drew nearer to me, sweetly questioning,
If I lack’d any thing.

A guest, I answer’d, worthy to be here:
Love said, You shall be he.
I the unkind, ungrateful? Ah my dear,
I cannot look on thee.
Love took my hand, and smiling did reply,
Who made the eyes but I?

Truth Lord, but I have marr’d them: let my shame
Go where it doth deserve.
And know you not, says Love, who bore the blame?
My dear, then I will serve.
You must sit down, says Love, and taste my meat:
So I did sit and eat.

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