Book 11: Persuasion by Jane Austen

Book 11: Persuasion by Jane Austen

Persuasion by Jane Austen

Persuasion by Jane Austen

A love story like no-other, Persuasion by Jane Austen was published in 1818, and was her final novel to have been written. The story centres on the love and drama of Anne Elliot and Fredrick Wentworth. It may have been the last story that Austen ever written, but it is a favourite love story that makes it a classic to read and enjoy this Christmas holidays.
More than eight years before the novel opens, Anne Elliot, then a lovely, thoughtful, warm-hearted 19-year old, accepted a proposal of marriage from the handsome young naval officer Frederick Wentworth. He was clever, confident, and ambitious, but poor and with no particular family connections to recommend him. Sir Walter, Anne’s snobbish father and her equally self-involved older sister Elizabeth were dissatisfied with her choice, maintaining that he was no match for an Elliot of Kellynch Hall, the family estate. Her older friend and mentor, Lady Russell, acting in place of Anne’s late mother, persuaded her to break the engagement, for she, too, felt it was an imprudent match that was beneath Anne. Now 27 and still unmarried, Anne re-encounters her former love when his sister and brother-in-law, the Crofts, take out a lease on Kellynch. Wentworth is now a captain and wealthy from maritime victories in the Napoleonic wars. However, he has not forgiven Anne for rejecting him. While publicly declaring that he is ready to marry any suitable young woman who catches his fancy, he privately resolves that he is ready to become attached to any appealing young woman with the exception of Anne Elliot.
It is a story that any romantic and classic reader would enjoy, as you read following the life of the sweet Anne, as she realises the utter mistake she made, and now have to watch the man she has loyal loved after all these years, be with another. Heartbreaking and overwhelming, Austen writing at her best, in her final novel.

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