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Book Review: Sister by Rosamund Lupton

sister

(From Goodreads) Nothing can break the bond between sisters …When Beatrice gets a frantic call in the middle of Sunday lunch to say that her younger sister, Tess, is missing, she boards the first flight home to London. But as she learns about the circumstances surrounding her sister’s disappearance, she is stunned to discover how little she actually knows of her sister’s life – and unprepared for the terrifying truths she must now face. The police, Beatrice’s fiancé and even their mother accept they have lost Tess but Beatrice refuses to give up on her. So she embarks on a dangerous journey to discover the truth, no matter the cost.

A gripping plot, and compelling well-written story takes place in London, when Beatrice receives phone call that her younger sister has gone missing.
The story touches on many elements of medicine and crime – but the most interesting is the description of the two sister’s bond that is clearly seen throughout the story. It is heart wrenchingly sad at some moments, and Lupton pulls at the emotion and psychological strings of the reader. One of the higlights of the book is, Beatrice is writing a letter to her sister, and the use of second-person personal pronoun, ‘you’, links the reader to the story, as if we take the place of the sister, – making it as if you are part of the story.

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Book Review: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

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(From Goodreads) Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

I loved the idea that the whole story is based on the surrounding circumstances of a train ride, where Rachel happens to see something that she shouldn’t have. This whole idea is terrifyingly good; because everyone has in one time of their life caught a train and looked outside the window. As Rachel catches the train every day from Ashbury to London and returns in the afternoon, we learn that she has a disconcerting obsession with a couple “Jason and Jess”, whose house she passes on her train commute. And as she gazes out of the window she witnesses something that she shouldn’t have. These blend of every normal activity, catching the train and then with the mysterious element is one thing that I like about the book. It’s a good premise for a thriller. Who hasn’t gazed from a train window and imagined the lives of others?

Your sympathies and suspicions shift as the story develops. Rachel’s alcoholism is a plot device and not an illness, as it keeps the story going forward and thickening with drama, because you know she knows something but she can’t recall it because she has no memory of that night when she had been drinking. You are pulled into the story, as Rachel tries to put her fractured pieces of her mind back together and the conclusion is a twist that should leave you waiting for Hawkins next novel, because it was such a great ending.
The book explores power, betrayal, relationships, while ratcheting tension.
Overall it was a great book.

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Book 21: A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Book 21: A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol by author Charles Dickens.  It was first published on 19 December 1843. The story was met with instant success and critical acclaim. A Christmas Carol tells the story of a bitter old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge and his transformation resulting from a supernatural visit by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmases Past, Present and Yet to Come.
A favourite among everyone from children to adults, this loveable book is perfect read for anyone looking for a Christmas type book. This book is one of my most of all favourites books for christmas since I first read it when I was a child and I hope it could be yours too. What about you do you like A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens?

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